Saturation:

\ˌsa-chə-ˈrā-shən\

noun: intensity of color, chromatic purity
origin: 1550s, formed in English from saturate, or else from Late Latin saturationem

Very Dark Red

noun:
The poetry of color as expressed through wine.

 THE WINE

Lush:

\ˈləsh\

adjective: very rich and providing great sensory pleasure: luxuriant, rich, succulent
origin: late Middle English: perhaps an alteration of obsolete lash ‘soft, lax,’ from Old French lasche ‘lax,’ by association with luscious.

Petit Verdot is a grape of dark color, stout tannins, and concentrated flavors. The small berries of Petite Sirah create a more intense maceration with a high skin-to-juice ratio and some of the longest tannins of any vinifera. Together they create a dark, concentrated wine that can be enjoyed now but will age well for a decade or more.

VDR is full-bodied yet supple, with deep, ripe fruit flavors of black currant and black raspberry perfumed by delicate notes of crushed violet. A firm, chalky tannin structure belies the velvety, luscious mouthfeel. Dense flavors integrate beautifully for a long, layered finish.

SUSTAINABILITY

Sustainability:

\səˌstā-nə-ˈbi-lə-tē\

noun: the quality of not being harmful to the environment or depleting natural resources, and thereby supporting long-term ecological balance
origin: 1610s, “bearable,” from sustain + -able. Attested from 1845 in the sense “defensible;” from 1965 with the meaning “capable of being continued at a certain level.”

VDR Wines is independently certified sustainable by the California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance (CSWA) through their Certified California Sustainable Winegrowing (CCSW) program.
 
CSWA is a third-party organization that sets forth best practices in environmental stewardship, conservation of natural resources, and socially equitable business practices as well as conducting yearly, independent audits of participants in their CCSW program.

 

VINEYARD

Passion:

\ˈpa-shən\

noun: ardent affection, fervor, and object of desire or deep interest
origin: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin passion

The grapes for VDR are grown on our estate vineyard in the Hames Valley sub-appellation, located in the southern reaches of Monterey County on the Central Coast of California. This little-known region of softly rolling topography presents ideal climatic conditions for growing top-notch reds.
 
Hames Valley is defined by a dramatic day-to-night temperature swing, with a 50 degree differential quite common. Although most of Monterey County possesses a cool maritime climate due to the influence of the nearby Pacific Ocean, Hames is sheltered from the chilly winds and receives a healthy dose of sunshine during the day, followed by a precipitous drop in temperature as the sun goes down.

 

The long, warm days allow full-bodied, dark fruit flavors to develop while the dramatic nighttime cooling preserves the balance and structure of this supple wine.

TEAM

Craft:

\kraft\

verb: to make or manufacture with skill and careful attention to detail
origin: before 900; Middle English; Old English cræft strength, skill; cognate with German Kraft, Dutch kracht, Old Norse kraptr

It takes a village to make great wine. From the vineyard to winemaking to bottling, we’re lucky to have a seasoned team led by Winemaker Dave Nagengast that brings together many years of collective experience growing and making wine in Monterey County.

 

More than that, they share our common values of sustainability, excellence and hard work that form the foundation for all we do. We know that making wine is one of the very best jobs in the world, and when you have a team of like-minded people working hard together, anything is possible!

At the end of the day, our goals with VDR are to bring people together over a meal, for celebrations big and small, and to make sure we over-deliver with a great wine. And that’s incredibly satisfying to all of us at Scheid Family Wines.

CONTACT US

Poetic:
\pō-ˈe-tik\

adjective: having a particularly beautiful or sensitively emotional style of expression
origin: 1520-30; Latin poēticus, Greek poiētikós.